Healing. Homes. Hope.

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Working for a nonprofit mental health and addictions provider is not for the faint of heart. Our employees take on life’s most difficult issues — joblessness, homelessness, social isolation, severe symptoms of psychosis, depression, addictions, gambling… I am fiercely proud of Cascadia’s staff and my gratitude for their work carries me through every single day.<br />
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<em><strong>— Derald Walker,</strong> Cascadia President/CEO</em> Sadly, we lost our son in 2010 after an incident brought on by his mental illness. Cascadia reached out and invited me to join the board. It was a way to honor our son and help others who struggle with mental health and addiction issues. I am so grateful to Cascadia for giving me this opportunity.<br />
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<em><strong>— Felesia Otis,</strong> Clinical Director at Volunteer of America Cascadia Board Member</em> Cascadia has emerged from the troubles of a few years ago not only with financial health, but as a critical partner to local governments and communities in offering a broad array of services. Cascadia and its hundreds of employees are improving the health of our communities.<br />
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<em><strong>—Michael Kaplan,</strong> FORMER Board Chair and Cascade AIDS Project Executive Director</em> In my outreach work, it’s hard to see and attempt to help people who have fallen through every last crack. These people let me into their homes and lives, and entrust me as a helper. That cooperation takes immense courage.<br />
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<em><strong>—Patricia Lund,</strong> Project Respond Crisis Counselor</em> I’ve been in the homeless services system in Portland for four years. I’ve found the glaring piece missing for people to recover is access to mental health services. Supporting people while they recover and providing a space that truly meets them where they are and doesn’t demand sobriety is important.<br />
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<em><strong>—Shannon Singleton,</strong>Royal Palm, Bud Clark Commons, and Street Outreach Programs</em> Without stable/safe housing it’s almost impossible for anyone to recover from serious mental illness. Residential programs do just that. Without them, we wouldn’t be able to provide the safe and supportive environments needed for recovery.
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<em><strong>— Royce Bowlin,</strong> Residential Services Senior Director</em> We provide culturally relevant treatment to people of color. External systemic barriers and lack of resources make recovery and stability difficult for the populations we serve. But we all are committed to diversity, inclusivity and respect. We are social work warriors!!
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<em><strong>—J. Rene’ Tucker,</strong> Recovery Services Program Manager</em> The hardest part of my work is the lack of resources. It is hard to witness the direct effects of classism, racism, and prejudice around mental health when what’s at stake is housing and access to
basic resources.
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<em><strong>—Meghan Lake,</strong> Case Coordination Program Supervisor</em> When I was diagnosed with schizophrenia at 19, everyone pretty much wrote me off. I made repeated suicide attempts. I eventually learned to see myself as a human, not a psychiatric diagnosis. I now work in Peer Wellness at Cascadia, helping people transform their lives.It’s a powerful lesson that no one’s life is hopeless!
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<em><strong>—Meghan Caughey,</strong> Peer and Wellness Services, Senior Director</em>